Gear Review: Camp Kitchen

One area of gear I can’t seem to get enough of is the camp kitchen. In the past year I’ve been through quite a few different iterations and combinations but I think I’ve finally settled on an effective setup. This post will take you through each bit of kit and my thoughts on them.

Name
Snow Peak Trek 900 Ti pot

Weight
124g

Bought from
Brookbank Canoes and Kayaks

Thoughts
The Snow Peak 900 is superbly light and does exactly what I need it to in camp, which is usually boiling water or boiling in the bag but sometimes involves cooking up more adventurous dinners. The original ‘frying pan’ lid was replaced with a simple, well made aluminium lid from Tinny at minibulldesign.
The only criticism I have of this pot relates to its shape – as you can see, it is taller than it is wide. This is great for storing everything inside but it would be better for proper cooking if there was more surface area in contact with the burner’s flame, such as on the Evernew 0,9L pan. The heat is very concentrated in pots like the Snow Peak 900 which can lead to burnt food unless it is stirred continuously. For boiling water or heating boil in the bag meals, however, it is spot on.

Name
backpackinglight Pocket Stove

Weight
139g

Bought from
backpackinglight

Thoughts
I first heard about this through The Outdoors Station. I had previously been using the burner support from my Mini Trangia but although it was lightweight it provided barely any wind protection for my trangia burner.
The basic design of the Pocket Stove is robust, easy to use and immensely packable. The back and side sections slide together and feature slots that can hold a trangia burner securely and at just the right height so that the maximum amount of heat reaches the pot. Alternatively, the base plate can slot in (in place of the burner) creating a platform ideal for burning small twigs or hexamine tablets. After use the five sections fold flat and fit inside my pot with all of the other gubbins for transport. I got the stainless steel model over the titanium one, and I do regret that decision slightly as the Ti does save you around 100g all in.

Name
Trangia meths burner

Weight
112g

Bought from
Cotswold Outdoor

Thoughts
What can I say about the trangia burner that hasn’t been said a million times? It is stamped from sheet brass, is practically bulletproof, can be used to store excess meths after cooking and works every time with very little need for maintenance. I first used one of these back in 1997 during a Duke of Edinburgh’s Award expedition with some good friends. It worked then and it works now. Hikin’ Jim wrote a great article on the trusty old trangia here.

Name
Lifeventure Titanium Mug

Weight
73g

Bought from
Cotswold Outdoor

Thoughts
It’s a single skin titanium mug with a capacity of about 450ml. It is incredibly light and has fold away handles but it does get red hot as soon as boiling water touches it; as long as you wait a few minutes for it to cool down a bit its no bother.

Name
Light my Fire Spork & Sea to Summit AlphaLight Long Spoon

Weight
22g

Bought from
Go Outdoorsclick4tents on eBay

Thoughts
I’ve had the Spork for a few years now and it does the job just fine and is cheap enough not to worry too much about breaking it. When I’m eating out of my pot or from a boil in the bag meal it pays to have a longer handled spoon so you don’t end up with chicken tikka all over your hands. This problem was remedied for the princely sum of £5 with the purchase of the long handled number in the picture above. The aluminium AlphaLight is lighter than the titanium one Sea to Summit also offer meaning I saved a couple of quid as well as 5g there, get in! The Muss recommends it too so it must be good.

So there it is. I keep everything in an Exped Fold Dry bag along with a bottle of meths, a pot cosy, a Light My Fire Mini Firesteel and a cotton bandana. Of course there are a couple of things I could upgrade to make my setup lighter but I’m more than happy with my kitchen’s performance as it stands. If anyone has any suggestions about how I could improve the performance of my setup please leave a comment.

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11 comments

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  6. Hikin' Jim · February 12, 2013

    That pocket stove looks interesting. I haven’t seen one of those over here on this side of the pond. I’ve used the Clikstand (and like it) which is somewhat similar. Nice post.

    Best regards,

    HJ

    • rcbprk · February 12, 2013

      Thanks for the kind words Jim. I’m a big fan of your blog, especially the thorough nature of your tests.

      I do like the design of the Pocket Stove, so much so I upgraded to the titanium version just before Christmas. You wouldn’t be interested in trying the stainless version out would you?

      • Hikin' Jim · February 13, 2013

        Of course I’d like to, but I’m very backed up right now if you can believe it. May I take a “rain check?”

        HJ

      • rcbprk · February 13, 2013

        No problem Jim. Just let me know when you’ve got a Pocket Stove sized slot free in your schedule and we can work something out.

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  8. webpage · May 8, 2013

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